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Elizabeta Koneska is an ethnologist who was born in and lives in Skopje, Macedonia. She studied in Belgrade and in Istanbul. Since 1985 Koneska has worked at the National Museum of Macedonia. Her research interests include coppersmith and tinsmith crafts, traditional food, the Slavic Orthodox community in Istanbul, and Turkish and other Muslim communities in Macedonia. She has researched and directed thirteen ethnological film projects in Macedonia and Turkey. These projects include: The Iron Church Above the Water (1993), The Sound of Hamer (2000), The Belgrade Coppersmith (2002), and Macedonians in Istanbul (2011). Peace for All has been screened at film festivals and universities in Bulgaria, Turkey, and Great Britain.
The Rev. Dr. Raphael Gamaliel Warnock began his pastorate of the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, GA on October 1, 2005. Dr. Warnock is a pastor with deep scholarly interests and a liberationist understanding of the gospel. Moreover, he comes with rich experience in urban ministry contexts, having served as associate minister of Birmingham’s Sixth Avenue Baptist Church, assistant pastor at Harlem’s Abyssinian Baptist Church and senior pastor of Baltimore’s Douglas Memorial Community Church. His dedication and commitment to the teachings of Jesus Christ and concern for the community provide a holistic ministry perspective on the work of the church.
An ordained Baptist minister within the historic black church, Jermaine McDonald is a doctoral candidate in the Ethics and Society course of study in Emory's Graduate Division of Religion. He is interested in religious rhetoric within progressive/liberal U.S. political discourse and the ways in which black Baptist churches have historically and contemporarily connected church mission and liberationist ideals with public/political goals. His dissertation, "The Canonization of Martin Luther King, Jr. – Collective Memory, Civil Religion, and the Reconstruction of an American Hero" explores how the reconstruction of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s legacy serves to distinguish recognizably American identity. Jermaine has a B.S. in Computer Science from the University of Virginia and an M.Div. from the Samuel DeWitt Proctor School of Theology at Virginia Union University. Prior to doctoral studies, he worked as a web-based systems developer and as a hospital and hospice chaplain.
Edward E. Curtis IV is Millennium Chair of the Liberal Arts and Professor of Religious Studies at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. He is the author or editor of six books, including The Encyclopedia of Muslim-American History. Most recently, Professor Curtis co-founded the Journal of Africana Religions.
Atalia Omer is Assistant Professor of Religion, Conflict, and Peace Studies and is a Faculty Fellow at The Center for the Study of Religion and Society at the University of Notre Dame. She earned her Ph.D. from the Committee on the Study of Religion at Harvard University. Her first book is When Peace is Not Enough: How the Israeli Peace Camp Thinks about Religion, Nationalism, and Justice (forthcoming, University of Chicago Press). Omer also is the author of the Religious Nationalism Handbooks (forthcoming, ABC-CLIO), and co-editor with R. Scott Appleby and David Little of the Oxford Handbook of Religion, Conflict and Peacebuilding (under contract with Oxford University Press). Omer has published articles in the Journal of the American Academy of Religion, Political Theology, The Study of Nationalism and Ethnicity, and The International Journal of Peace Studies.
Dr. Frank Rogers’ research and teaching focus is on spiritual formation that is contemplative, creative, and socially liberative. A trained spiritual director and experienced retreat leader, he has written on the interconnections between spirituality, social engagement, and compassion. He is the author of The God of Shattered Glass, A Novel, and of Finding God in the Graffiti: Empowering Teenagers through Stories which explores the role of the narrative arts (storytelling, drama, creative writing, and autobiography) in the spiritual formation of youth and abused and marginalized children.
Thomas Flores completed his PhD from Emory University in Religion with a focus on Religion, Conflict, and Interfaith Peacebuilding. He served as Emory’s first Post-doctoral Fellow in the Initiative in Religion, Conflict, and Peacebuilding (IRCP). He was also a Visiting Assistant Professor of Peacebuilding and Conflict Transformation Practices at the Candler School of Theology, as well as Director of External Relations and Program Coordinator for Emory's IRCP. His research and teaching has also focused on altruism and enemy construction, reconciliation, strategic arts-based peacebuildings, contemplative approaches to peacebuilding, and peace museums. He is President of Integrative Peace Approaches LLC, and functions as an independent scholar and consultant.
John E. Senior is Assistant Professor of the Practice of Religion and Society at Wake Forest University School of Divinity. In 2010, Senior earned the Ph.D. in the Ethics and Society course of study from Emory University’s Graduate Division of Religion. He is an elder in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) and a Candidate for Ministry of the Word and Sacrament. Previously, Senior taught courses in Christian theology and ethics and the sociology of religion at the Candler School of Theology, Columbia Theological Seminary, and in the Theology Certificate Program at the Lee Arrendale State Women’s Prison in Alto, GA.
Stanley Hauerwas is Gilbert T. Rowe Professor of Theological Ethics at Duke University Divinity School. He was named "America’s Best Theologian" by Time magazine in 2001. Dr. Hauerwas delivered the prestigious Gifford Lectureship at the University of St. Andrews, Scotland in 2001. His book, A Community of Character: Toward a Constructive Christian Social Ethic, was selected as one of the 100 most important books on religion of the 20th century.
An ordained Baptist minister within the historic black church, Jermaine McDonald is a doctoral candidate in the Ethics and Society course of study in Emory's Graduate Division of Religion. He is interested in religious rhetoric within progressive/liberal U.S. political discourse and the ways in which black Baptist churches have historically and contemporarily connected church mission and liberationist ideals with public/political goals. His dissertation, "The Canonization of Martin Luther King, Jr. – Collective Memory, Civil Religion, and the Reconstruction of an American Hero" explores how the reconstruction of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s legacy serves to distinguish recognizably American identity. Jermaine has a B.S. in Computer Science from the University of Virginia and an M.Div. from the Samuel DeWitt Proctor School of Theology at Virginia Union University. Prior to doctoral studies, he worked as a web-based systems developer and as a hospital and hospice chaplain.
Jessica M. Smith is a fourth year PhD candidate in Theological Studies at Emory's Graduate Division of Religion. As a constructive theologian, she is particularly interested in contextualized pedagogy in theological education, contemporary and historical contemplative theology, media and film studies, and spiritual activism. Her dissertation is a historical-constructive theological project that considers how persons marginalized from the Church relate to the symbol of the angel. When not considering the angel's relationship to the human, she can be found seeking out the funniest sitcoms and transformative television programs on the air today.
James W. McCarty III is a doctoral candidate in Religion (Ethics and Society) at Emory University. His dissertation is a constructive Christian ethic of transitional justice. More generally, his research is on the intersections of religion, conflict and peacebuilding, and the ethics of forgiveness, justice, and reconciliation. He has published articles in the Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics, St. John’s Law Review, and West Virginia Law Review.
Joe Wiinikka-Lydon is a doctoral student in the Ethics and Society course of study at Emory University. He is also a member of the Religion, Conflict and Peacebuilding Initiative at Emory. His interests focus on the ways that virtue ethics, religious studies and ethics more generally can help us engage issues of mass violence. Having published on the Bosnian genocide and the role of religion and conflict, Joe is also interested moral development during periods of violent conflict, as well as liberatory ethics and ethics of resistance. He has a BA from Georgetown University and an MDiv from Harvard. Joe is also a published poet and has lived and worked in Turkey, Kenya and Bosnia-Hercegovina. Before joining the doctoral program at Emory, Joe worked in fundraising, as well as education and human rights organizations.
R. Scott Appleby is Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame, where he also serves as the John M. Regan Jr. Director of the Joan B. Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies. He is author of The Ambivalence of the Sacred: Religion, Violence and Reconciliation (2000) and the co-editor, with Martin E. Marty, of the University of Chicago Press series of five volumes on global fundamentalisms, which won the American Academy of Religion's Award for Excellence in the Study of Religion. In his capacity as a peace scholar Appleby is co-editor of the Oxford University Press book series, Studies in Strategic Peacebuilding, and of the Oxford Handbook on Religion, Conflict and Peacebuilding. As director of the Kroc Institute, he established the Catholic Peacebuilding Network, an international association of peace scholars and practitioners, and co-edited its first scholarly volume, Peacebuilding: Catholic Theology, Ethics and Praxis (2010). Appleby also chaired the Task Force on Religion and the Making of U.S. Foreign Policy of the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, and co-authored its report, “Engaging Religious Communities Abroad: A New Imperative for U.S. Foreign Policy” (April 2010). He is the director of the Notre Dame research and education project “Contending Modernities: Catholic, Muslim, Secular,” and co-director of a Social Science Research Council project on Peacebuilding, Development and Religion.
Rahel Wasserfall is an anthropologist with a PhD from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem with extensive experience in her field in three different continents. She has published widely on gender issues and is the editor of Women and Water: Menstruation in Jewish Life and Law (UPNE, 1999). After moving to Boston in 1996, Wasserfall shifted her interest to Jewish education and evaluation studies. She was a resident scholar at the Women's Studies Research Center (WSRC) at Brandeis University and Special Coordinator at Boston's Jewish Community Day School, in which capacity she directed the Association of Independent School of New England (AISNE) accreditation process. She also co-authored (with Susan Shevitz) a study on Jewish pluralism in a local Jewish day school. She has broad expertise in qualitative evaluation and is the yearly evaluator of the International Summer School on Religion and Public Life. In the last ten years Wasserfall has evaluated educational programs in a variety of complex multilingual and cross-cultural settings. Among other assignments, she has recently served as director of evaluation at the Center for the Advancement of Hebrew Teaching and Learning Inc. and senior research associate at Education Matters, Inc. and the Mandel Center for Jewish Education at Brandeis. In September 2012 she will return to the WSRC to work on a book about her nine years of evaluating the ISSRPL. Her work in the world of evaluation focuses on a pragmatic approach to knowledge that continually asks, “knowledge for whom and for which purposes?” Wasserfall is also a committed yoga practitioner and teacher, having completed teacher training in the Iyengar tradition.
AnneMarie Mingo is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Ethics and Society course of study in the Graduate Division of Religion at Emory University. Her research interests include the socio-religious activism of African American women, and theological and ethical influences in social movements. She is currently completing her dissertation in which she develops a theology and ethic from the lived experiences of Black Churchwomen who were involved in the Civil Rights Movement. This interdisciplinary work engages the fields of American history, liberation theology, and social ethics.
M. Christian Green, J.D./Ph.D. is a Senior Fellow at the Center for the Study of Law and Religion and an alumna of the Law and Religion Program at Emory University, with a doctorate in religious ethics from the University of Chicago. She has taught at DePaul University, Harvard Divinity School, and the Candler School of Theology, and was recently a visiting fellow at the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies. Her areas of research interest are law, religion, ethics, human rights, world affairs. She is currently serving as the religion book editor for the Journal of Law and Religion (http://law.hamline.edu/jlr/journal-law-and-religion.html).
Thomas Massaro, S.J., a Jesuit priest of the New England Province, is currently professor of moral theology at the School of Theology and Ministry at Boston College. As of July 1, 2012, Dr. Massaro will be the new dean of the Jesuit School of Theology at Santa Clara University. He holds a doctorate in Christian social ethics from Emory University. He has published several books and many articles on topics related to Catholic social teaching and public policy. He is the co-author (with Thomas A. Shannon) of Catholic Perspectives on Peace and War (Rowman and Littlefield, 2003).
Rodney L. Petersen, Ph.D. is Executive Director of The Boston Theological Institute (http://www.bostontheological.org/) (BTI), the consortium theological schools in the Greater Boston area. He is co-director of the Religion and Conflict Transformation program at Boston University School of Theology and teaches in the areas of history and ethics. He is author or co-editor of numerous publications, including, Forgiveness and Reconciliation: Religion, Public Policy and Conflict Transformation (2002), Overcoming Violence (2010), and Formation for Life: Just Peacemaking and 21st Century Discipleship (2012).
Hazem Ziada received his doctorate from Georgia Institute of Technology (2011) for a dissertation titled: Gregarious Space, Uncertain Grounds, Undisciplined Bodies: The Soviet Avant-Garde and the ‘Crowd’ Design Problem. He has published and presented scholarly papers on the topic of performance, kinesthesis, and architectural space. He has presented numerous papers at scholarly conferences, on topics such as “Le Corbusier and the Problem of Bodies: A Discussion of Le Corbusier’s entry to the Palace of Soviets Competition,” and “Kinesthetic Foundations of Spatial Concepts and Configurations.”  He presented “Aesthetics of Ritual Space: The Case of the Mosque,” at the 2009 annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion and is a member of that organization’s Space, Place, and Religious Meaning Consultation. He also authored the “Mosque before 1900” entry in the Oxford Companion to Architecture (2009). Ziada co-teaches a summer class on “Sacred Space” at Emory University’s Candler School of Theology. Ziada has taught history-theory courses and design studios throughout the curriculum for about twelve years, including beginning-design studios, environmental studios, and senior theses. He has practiced architecture in Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and the US.
Dr. Elizabeth Corrie is Assistant Professor in the Practice of Youth Education and Peacebuilding at Candler School of Theology. She received her M.Div. from Candler in 1996 and her Ph.D. from Emory in 2002. She draws on commitments both to peace with justice and to the education of young people as a foundation for her work in the development of practices that empower young people for global citizenship. Her research interests include theories and practices of nonviolent strategies for social change, the religious roots of violence and nonviolence, international peacebuilding initiatives, and character education and moral development with children and youth.
James W. McCarty III is a doctoral candidate in Religion (Ethics and Society) at Emory University. His dissertation is a constructive Christian ethic of transitional justice. More generally, his research is on the intersections of religion, conflict and peacebuilding, and the ethics of forgiveness, justice, and reconciliation. He has published articles in the Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics, St. John’s Law Review, and West Virginia Law Review.
Joe Wiinikka-Lydon is a doctoral student in the Ethics and Society course of study at Emory University. He is also a member of the Religion, Conflict and Peacebuilding Initiative at Emory. His interests focus on the ways that virtue ethics, religious studies and ethics more generally can help us engage issues of mass violence. Having published on the Bosnian genocide and the role of religion and conflict, Joe is also interested moral development during periods of violent conflict, as well as liberatory ethics and ethics of resistance. He has a BA from Georgetown University and an MDiv from Harvard. Joe is also a published poet and has lived and worked in Turkey, Kenya and Bosnia-Hercegovina. Before joining the doctoral program at Emory, Joe worked in fundraising, as well as education and human rights organizations.
Mazvita M. Machinga, a Zimbabwean citizen, is the Director and Founder of the Pastoral Care and Counseling Centre in Mutare, Zimbabwe.  Mazvita holds an M.A and a Ph.D from the Claremont School of Theology in Claremont in CA. Mazvita has over 15 years  serving communities as a clinician, educator and workshop facilitator. Mazvita's work on pastoral care and counseling focuses on issues of healing from trauma, religious leaders training in pastoral counseling and transpersonal approaches to therapy.
Wes Browning has spent the past twelve years as a filmmaker dedicated to telling stories that capture the human spirit. His work includes documentary films and non-profit and corporate promotion. Wes has a particular passion for stories that occur on the continent of Africa. He and his wife, Melissa Browning, have traveled throughout the sub-Saharan Africa region and lived for three years in Kenya and Tanzania, working with HIV positive women, refugees and street children. Wes and his wife currently live in Atlanta, GA with their daughter Olivia and dog Jack..
Ryan Rodrick Beiler is a photographer and writer who works for a church-based humanitarian development agency based in East Jerusalem. His photographs and blog appear at www.ryanrodrickbeiler.com. Follow him on twitter @RRodrickBeiler.
Philip S. Gorski is Professor of Sociology and Co-Director of the Center for Comparative Research at Yale University. He is also co-convener of the Religion and Politics Colloquium at the Yale MacMillan Center. His recent books include The Protestant Ethic Revisited (Temple University Press, 2011) and The Disciplinary Revolution: Calvinism, Confessionalism and the Growth of State Power in Early Modern Europe (University of Chicago Press, 2003).
Dr. Ellen Ott Marshall (M.A. Notre Dame 1992, M.A./Ph.D. Vanderbilt 2000) is Associate Professor of Christian Ethics and Conflict Transformation at Candler School of Theology, Emory University. She is also on the faculty for the Ethics and Society doctoral program in Emory’s Graduate Division of Religion, where she serves as co-convener for the initiative in Religion, Conflict, and Peacebuilding. Her books include: Choosing Peace through Daily Practices (2005), Though the Fig Tree Does Not Blossom: Toward a Responsible Theology of Christian Hope (2006), and Christians in the Public Square: Faith that Transforms Politics (2008). In 2009, she served as lead writer for God’s Renewed Creation, a pastoral letter and foundation document from the Council of Bishops of the United Methodist Church.
Edward Queen II is director of the D. Abbott Turner Program in Ethics and Servant Leadership and Coordinator of Undergraduate Studies at Emory University’s Center for Ethics. At Emory he also serves as Director of Research for the Institute of Human Rights and co-convener of the Initiative on Religion, Conflict, and Peacebuilding. Queen received his B.A. from Birmingham-Southern College, his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the Divinity School of the University of Chicago, and his J.D. from the Indiana University School of Law-Indianapolis. A specialist in issues related to professional and social ethics, religious and ethnic conflict, and civil society, Queen has written, coauthored, or edited numerous books, including Serving Those In Need: A Handbook for Managing Faith-Based Human Services Organizations (2000), Philanthropy in the World's Traditions (1998), and The Encyclopedia of American Religious History (1992, rev. ed. 2002, 3rd rev. ed. 2009).
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An ordained Baptist minister within the historic black church, Jermaine McDonald is a doctoral candidate in the Ethics and Society course of study in Emory's Graduate Division of Religion. He is interested in religious rhetoric within progressive/liberal U.S. political discourse and the ways in which black Baptist churches have historically and contemporarily connected church mission and liberationist ideals with public/political goals. His dissertation, "The Canonization of Martin Luther King, Jr. – Collective Memory, Civil Religion, and the Reconstruction of an American Hero" explores how the reconstruction of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s legacy serves to distinguish recognizably American identity. Jermaine has a B.S. in Computer Science from the University of Virginia and an M.Div. from the Samuel DeWitt Proctor School of Theology at Virginia Union University. Prior to doctoral studies, he worked as a web-based systems developer and as a hospital and hospice chaplain.
Ryan Rodrick Beiler is a photographer and writer who works for a church-based humanitarian development agency based in East Jerusalem. His photographs and blog appear at www.ryanrodrickbeiler.com. Follow him on twitter @RRodrickBeiler.
Jessica M. Smith is a fourth year PhD candidate in Theological Studies at Emory's Graduate Division of Religion. As a constructive theologian, she is particularly interested in contextualized pedagogy in theological education, contemporary and historical contemplative theology, media and film studies, and spiritual activism. Her dissertation is a historical-constructive theological project that considers how persons marginalized from the Church relate to the symbol of the angel. When not considering the angel's relationship to the human, she can be found seeking out the funniest sitcoms and transformative television programs on the air today.
James W. McCarty III is a doctoral candidate in Religion (Ethics and Society) at Emory University. His dissertation is a constructive Christian ethic of transitional justice. More generally, his research is on the intersections of religion, conflict and peacebuilding, and the ethics of forgiveness, justice, and reconciliation. He has published articles in the Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics, St. John’s Law Review, and West Virginia Law Review.
Professor Scully is Professor and Chair of the Department of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Emory. She has her Ph.D. in history from the University of Michigan. Her research interests focus on comparative women's and gender history, with an emphasis on slavery and emancipation, and, more recently, on the relevance of history and feminist theory to ensuring women's rights in post-conflict societies. Her most recent book is Sara Baartman and the Hottentot Venus: a Ghost Story and a Biography, co-authored with Clifton Crais (Princeton, 2009). She is the author of Liberating the Family? Gender and British Slave Emancipation in the Rural Western Cape, South Africa, 1823-1853 (Heinemann, 1997). Her co-edited collection with Diana Paton of the University of Newcastle, Gender and Slave Emancipation in the Atlantic World came out in 2005 with Duke University Press. She is the author of the AHA pamphlet, Race and Ethnicity in Women's and Gender History in Global Perspective (2006).  Professor Scully is working on a book on humanitarian interventions, transitional justice, and sexual violence, with a focus on Liberia. She teaches courses on gender, violence and genocide, genealogies of feminist thought, and feminist approaches to international human rights. She is Deputy Editor of The Women’s History Review. Professor Scully serves on the editorial board of The Journal of Women’s HistoryThe Journal of British StudiesThe Journal of Peacebuilding and Development, and Social Dynamics. Dr Scully works closely with the Institute for Developing Nations, a partnership between Emory University and The Carter Center, which focuses on collaborative research regarding issues of poverty and development.
Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na’im is the Charles Howard Candler Professor of Law at Emory Law, associated professor in the Emory College of Arts and Sciences and faculty affiliate at the Emory University Center for Ethics. An internationally recognized scholar of Islam and human rights and human rights in cross-cultural perspectives, he has published the groundbreaking books Islam and the Secular State: Negotiating the Future of Shari’a (Harvard University Press, 2008) and Toward an Islamic Reformation: Civil Liberties, Human Rights, and International Law (Syracuse University Press, 1998).
Tara Doyle is a Senior Lecturer at Emory University and Director of Tibetan Studies Program in India. She received her B.A. from Antioch College (Yellow Springs, OH), her M.T.S. from Harvard Divinity School, and her M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard University. Before coming to Emory she taught at Williams College (1995-1997), and was the co-founder and co-director of Antioch University's Comparative Buddhist Studies Program in Bodh Gaya, India (1979-1994). Her areas of research are in Buddhist and Hindu pilgrimage, ex-untouchable Buddhist converts, contemplative practices, and Socially Engaged Buddhism. She also specializes in developing study abroad programs in India and in Theory Practice Learning (TPL) pedagogy. She has received numerous recognitions for stellar teaching, including Emory's prestigious Crystal Apple award (2008). Her current manuscript, Bodh Gaya: Journeys to the Diamond Throne, focuses on the (re)creation of Bodh Gaya as an international Buddhist center over the last two centuries. She has written several articles on this material, as well as on Buddhism in the United States.
Edward Queen II is director of the D. Abbott Turner Program in Ethics and Servant Leadership and Coordinator of Undergraduate Studies at Emory University’s Center for Ethics. At Emory he also serves as Director of Research for the Institute of Human Rights and co-convener of the Initiative on Religion, Conflict, and Peacebuilding. Queen received his B.A. from Birmingham-Southern College, his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the Divinity School of the University of Chicago, and his J.D. from the Indiana University School of Law-Indianapolis. A specialist in issues related to professional and social ethics, religious and ethnic conflict, and civil society, Queen has written, coauthored, or edited numerous books, including Serving Those In Need: A Handbook for Managing Faith-Based Human Services Organizations (2000), Philanthropy in the World's Traditions (1998), and The Encyclopedia of American Religious History (1992, rev. ed. 2002, 3rd rev. ed. 2009).
Jacob D. Myers is a Ph.D. candidate at Emory University working at the intersection of homiletical theory, poststructural thought, and emerging Christianity. His dissertation, "Witnessing the Word Erotic: A Theology of Proclamation," articulates a new theology of proclamation in response to the contemporary epistemological situation impacting Western churches. A graduate of Gardner-Webb University and Princeton Theological Seminary and an ordained minister in the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship, Jacob has served churches in Georgia, North Carolina and Pennsylvania. In addition to his doctoral work, Jacob has/or currently serves as an adjunct preaching instructor at Candler School of Theology, Central Baptist Theological Seminary, and Columbia Theological Seminary.
Joe Wiinikka-Lydon is a doctoral student in the Ethics and Society course of study at Emory University. He is also a member of the Religion, Conflict and Peacebuilding Initiative at Emory. His interests focus on the ways that virtue ethics, religious studies and ethics more generally can help us engage issues of mass violence. Having published on the Bosnian genocide and the role of religion and conflict, Joe is also interested moral development during periods of violent conflict, as well as liberatory ethics and ethics of resistance. He has a BA from Georgetown University and an MDiv from Harvard. Joe is also a published poet and has lived and worked in Turkey, Kenya and Bosnia-Hercegovina. Before joining the doctoral program at Emory, Joe worked in fundraising, as well as education and human rights organizations.
William Yoo is a doctoral candidate in the Historical Studies in Theology and Religion course of study in the Graduate Division of Religion at Emory University. His dissertation explores the complex dynamics of race, religion, and interracial romance within the transnational encounter between Koreans and Americans from 1880 to 1965. He is also interested in early modern European religious history, North American religious history, world Christianity, and Asian American religions. Prior to doctoral studies, he worked in public policy and as a youth pastor in a Korean American church. He is a member and certified candidate for ordination in the Presbyterian Church (USA).
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